Adjudicated vs BYOV – Staff

Now that we’ve announced the basic framework of the festival (i.e. our three year strategic plan, which we call FringeNYC 2020) we’ll be diving into the nitty gritty of how the various segments of the festival will compare.

Here is a first look at what staff will be provided for FringeNYC vs the BYOV options:

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Adjudicated vs BYOV – Programs & Services

Now that we’ve announced the basic framework of the festival (i.e. our three year strategic plan, which we call FringeNYC 2020) we’ll be diving into the nitty gritty of how the various segments of the festival will compare.

Here are some thoughts about the various programs and services that FringeNYC has always offered, and who’ll have access to what. Note the timeline is from the prior festivals (back when the festival was in August). Now that our festival is in October, dates would obviously change.

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Adjudicated vs BYOV – Ticketing

Now that we’ve announced the basic framework of the festival (i.e. our three year strategic plan, which we call FringeNYC 2020) we’ll be diving into the nitty gritty of how the various segments of the festival will compare.

Next up, some thoughts about ticketing:

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Adjudicated vs BYOV – Marketing

Now that we’ve announced the basic framework of the festival (i.e. our three year strategic plan, which we call FringeNYC 2020) we’ll be diving into the nitty gritty of how the various segments of the festival will compare.

Up first, thoughts about marketing as discussed at some of our convenings:

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Friday Founder Flashback – Filing Playbills

Friday Founder Flashback – Filing Playbills

I‘m filing these by year, now, and wondering if I’m supposed to file them by the year of the commercial production or the show’s FringeNYC year? Regardless – thanks for inviting me, y’all!

 

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Friday Founder Flashback – 2010 Tickets

Friday Founder Flashback – 2010 Tickets

Each October, we go into the barn and pull out the boxes of box office envelopes from the festival that was seven years ago and throw away the tickets. You see, per our document retention policy and our agreement with our artists – we’re required to keep the ticket stubs and “deadwood” (unused tickets) for that length of time. It’s always a bit bittersweet for me. But it brings back some wonderful memories every time.

 

So this year, I went through about twenty boxes from 2010. What an amazing year! I have very specific memories for each of these shows, and more importantly, for all of these artists. And only three more years now – as FringeNYC ticketing went completely paperless in 2014, so there’s no more stubs or deadwood. I guess environmentally, that’s a good thing. Still – it’s kinda cool to get to put these in the scrapbook.

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FringeNYC 20/20: Why be our new home

FringeNYC 20/20: Why be our new home

Now that we’ve talked about why finding a longer term / smaller footprint home for the adjudicated section of FringeNYC is our goal, we wanted to discuss some of what we could potentially offer our venue partners / hosts. We know our new venue neighborhood or multiplex will need incentives, particularly for providing a home during October (when they are more likely to find rentals and / or be doing their own shows as a part of their season). And unfortunately, although we will certainly still pay a rental fee – we won’t be able to pay them double our usual fee or anything like that. Keep in mind we are doing a SMALLER festival, so we’ll already need to build a new funding model.

 

 

So here’s some of what we came up with in initial brainstorming about what we might offer our new venue home:
VENUE POOL PARTICIPATION – When we produced the First Annual New York International Fringe Festival in 1997, we operated entirely on earned income. Collectively, each of our $315 (I think that’s right. . . ) participation fees (along with a $5,000 NYSCA pass-through grant from ART/NY) added up to $74,000. So in order to secure venues, we put $1 from every ticket sold across the entire festival into a pot, and each of our venues got a share. Not a proportionate / based on size share, and not a share of only the tickets sold at their venue. There were 21 venues that year, so they each got 1/21th (twenty oneth?) of that pool. Back then, that was particularly brave of them (keep in mind we’d never done a fringe festival before, and we weren’t sure anyone would show up). These days, though, we can count on selling SOME tickets. And it’d be nice to have a venue home that was invested in our success as a community.

PROMOTION OF THE VENUE’S SHOWS – Throughout the year, many venues and producers would like to reach our audience to promote their shows. Eblasts, mailing list access, and our Amazonification (i.e. “if you liked this show, you’ll like this one” via the Find Your FringeNYC Quiz) could all be shared with our home venues.

PERCENTAGE OF SPONSORSHIP MONEY – It is very difficult to obtain sponsorships without knowing two years out where we’ll be and what we’re doing. Sponsors want a big gathering area – and we do, too, but in NYC that requires a street closure permit or large private outdoor space. Street closure permit applications are due a year in advance – and difficult to obtain (particularly for multi-day requests). If our venue home helps make a large gathering area possible, and allows us to lock in that location for three to five years – then that would perhaps make us more attractive to sponsors. So maybe our new long-term venue home should see financial benefit from those sponsorships as well!

VENUE SHOWS – In the first year (or two?) of the festival, our venue partners each got to put a “venue show” in the festival. If we’re going to be doing FringeNYC in October in one long-term venue home, then perhaps their October show could be part of the festival, as well. We’re often asked throughout the year to promote their season shows to our audience – why not introduce them to the kind of work that the venue home does as a part of FringeNYC? It’d be a great opportunity to brand the venue with our most loyal audience members and to build relationships under the “halo” of the festival.

CAREFUL SCHEDULING – We could, potentially, perform around their subscription show’s schedule in October. At least in 2018, if it made it possible to lock down a venue home neighborhood / multi-plex for three to five years. Perhaps their subscribers would receive special discounts to FringeNYC shows, too. And vice versa? Maybe our FringeNYC audience would want to purchase discounted single tickets to their subscription show.

Over the past decade, it seems to be the big brother and big sister theatres around town that want access to and a connection to our audience – and to our artists, as well. This would be a great way to show support of the next generation of makers.

AND MOST IMPORTANTLY – We will only have ONE Manhattan venue home for the adjudicated section of FringeNYC – either a multi-plex or venues all on one block, etc.  The BYOV (or VBYOA) section of the festival will ONLY be in boroughs other than Manhattan. So our new venue home becomes the defacto center of the indie universe during FringeNYC / Indie Theatre Week and all that FringeNYC 20/20 entails. 

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Friday Founder Flashback – Ghostlight

Friday Founder Flashback – Ghostlight

From January 19th, 2017 – The Ghostlight Project – this is what we stood with our community and said:

“We pledge to continue to provide a home for our disenfranchised friends – be they LGBTQ, immigrant, people of color, differently abled, women or just hungry for community, like the rest of us. We recognize that in order to truly be a place where ALL are welcome, and in order to try to understand WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED, we’re gonna have to open our hearts and minds. . .even to those with whom we strongly and passionately disagree. We MUST try to listen and find empathy. It will be hard. But we, of all people, know that hate is so often born of fear and pain – and we, of all people, know these things, too. We know fear. We know pain. And so we pledge to use our collective strength – our empathy and compassion and the power of our art – to reach for understanding. . . so that ALL are welcome.”

FringeNYC 20/20: We need a long term home

Okay, but WHERE? As you may have heard as a part of our FringeNYC 20/20 Announcement, starting in 2018, FringeNYC will include a smaller adjudicated festival – which will take place all in one block, area, or multi-venue complex for multiple years. There are many reasons for this, and we’ll definitely need some help to make it happen.

 

Some of the reasons we’ve made this our goal include:
An audience that knows where to find us (annually) will more likely (and easily) return
A smaller festival footprint will allow us to also consolidate staff / reduce actual hours per staff member
This will allow more experienced / mature staff to be able to continue to work with us and we’ll retain more institutional knowledge
Our Tech Director once reported they spent more time walking from venue to venue (when on call) than actually doing the job
Over time, we get to know the quirks of each area / neighbor / etc. and can build on this knowledge
We spend way too much of our staff time & very limited resources finding / negotiating contracts with venues
A long term relationship will make it more than a “rental” – we’re looking at more of a full partnership
We would get to know each building’s idiosyncrasies – and make them a “feature not a bug”
When we purchase specific equipment needed for each space, design specific soft goods, marley, etc. we could use it in the same location the following years (or even better: leave it at the venue to be used throughout the year)
We could invest / help fundraise for accessibility and other issues to be dealt with
Knowing where we’ll be years in advance would provide the required lead time for securing sponsors for extras like street closures, a gathering location / FringeLOUNGE, etc.
Photography of prior year’s events, etc. would be helpful in securing sponsors (as opposed to now, when we “start over” each year)
We would have accurate drawings / capacities / more likely to have accurate rep plots
Finding available, ground floor real estate for FringeCENTRAL / FringeLOUNGE has become impossible (Hoisted on our own petard – we feel like we INVENTED pop-up retail. . . )
We could utilize what we know about our spaces as a part of adjudication process
We could program our desired FringeAL FRESCO / Spectacle / Visual Art knowing where we’d be
In NYC, Street Closure permit applications are due the YEAR PRIOR, but you really want to request a street closure where your venues will be
We’d like to build longer term relationships with politicians, owners, and community boards – like when we were born, on the LES

There are many more reasons this makes sense for a festival. And we think there are plenty of reasons a group of venues or multiple venue complex would want to partner with us on this. We’ll discuss some of those in the next post.

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FringeNYC 20/20: We’ve decided WHEN

FringeNYC 20/20: We’ve decided WHEN

October! As you may have heard as a part of our FringeNYC 20/20 Announcement, starting in 2018, FringeNYC will take place annually in October!

As those of you who’ve been keeping up with this blog know, we’ve had a lot of discussions about WHEN. Suffice to say, every possible month on the calendar has some challenges. But here is our list of bottom line Pros and Cons that led to this decision:

PROS
There are no other NYC multi-arts festivals in NYC in October
There are no other US Association of Fringe Festivals festivals in October
There are no other World Fringe Alliance festivals in the majority of October (Cape Town Fringe ends in early October)
So World Fringe Alliance festival leaders could attend FringeNYC, as could their artists
We think this date shift will help cement us as the National Fringe Festival beginning in 2019
College students will be back in the city for college
October is not when the US Association of Fringe Festivals usually meets
IT’S NOT AS HOT as the summer (Air conditioning challenges utilize too much of our resources)
With students in school, we could partner with a university (or two) for internships, etc.
We could potentially share resources / collaborate with other summer festivals
Being in October makes FringeNYC like “Indie Theatre” Week (or 3 weeks) (following on the heels of Broadway Week and Off-Broadway Week)
It helps us focus attention on local indie venues and producers during their season, featuring their work
It could radically change our FringeJR & FringeHIGH programs as we are able to coord. w/schools, etc.

CONS (or what we prefer to call “challenges”)
It IS the middle of regular season programming, so our venue partners will need incentives (we have some ideas)
College students will be back in the city for college – this is both a pro and a con – will NEED to partner with a university for interns
October is when Hurricane Sandy happened (August is when Irene and the Earthquake happened, though, so. . . )
Jewish Holidays fall during October, which will make attendance on some nights difficult for some (the same is true for Sabbath performances throughout the year, though).

So – on to meeting these challenges and finding a WHERE to go with our WHEN!

What do you think? Are there other pros and cons we may have overlooked?

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Calendar of Fringes

Here is a calendar that shows the fringe festivals in the United States, the World Fringe Alliance festivals, and SOME of the performing arts festivals in NYC!

 

 

 

 

Friday Founder Flashback – FringeFANS!

Here’s some fringe fans showing us how it’s done – and reminding us of WHY fans come all the way from Arkansas! Thanks, Carl & Jackie!

 

 

 

 

 

Hypothesis – Fringe Movement in the U.S.

Hypothesis – Fringe Movement in the U.S.

This is a movement! We’re so happy to celebrate World Fringe Day with our fellow fringes across the globe. The FIRST fringe – Edinburgh Festival Fringe – is celebrating their 70th birthday as we celebrate our 20th! And in Canada, the CAFF (Canadian Association of Fringe Festivals) festivals are essentially Canada’s national theatre.

But fear not – there is a strong fringe movement in this country, too. Above is a chart tracking the number of US Association of Fringe Festival member fringes born in each year in the U.S. – and here they are by name!

 

 

What I Love about Fringe

What I Love about Fringe

In celebration of World Fringe Day – tell us what you love about FringeNYC, or any other fringe! YOU may win a pair of tickets to

FringeNYC 20/20  – Sunday, August 20th

celebrating FringeNYC’s first twenty years, and announcing FringeNYC’s future.

Just click the button below to make your video. You’ll have to enter your name / email.

#WorldFringeDay  #Fringe70   #FringeNYC20

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World Fringe Congress

Tomorrow is World Fringe Day! To get ready, here’s a video from World Fringe Congress last November, with Holly from World Fringe Network, Shona from Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Kerri from Sydney Fringe, Davide from Roma Fringe, Christina from San Francisco Fringe and Me (from FringeNYC) talking about Fringe models!

 

 

 

 

 

Hypothesis – What FringeNYC spends on each show is increasing. . .

Hypothesis – What FringeNYC spends on each show is increasing. . .

Here’s a chart showing total expenses divided by number of shows in order to determine what FringeNYC spends on each show in any given year (as an adjudicated festival in our first twenty years).

Observations:
We are working with data from 2004 to 2016
The relationship between the number of shows and our expenses doesn’t always directly correlate, but a definite pattern can be seen from 2009 to 2013, as the number of shows drop our expenses are also lower
It appears our most “cost effective” years are those with the highest numbers of shows (as our model is a bulk model), the best examples of this are 2006, 2008 and 2014.
It is interesting to note that expenses doubled from 2004 to 2009, which is a significant increase in a 5 year span, however the number of shows presented only increased by around 5%
The major rises in expenses from 2004 to 2005 and from 2008 to 2009 do NOT correlate to the number of shows presented, as in those years the number of shows presented lowered, meaning outside factors led to these increases.
Average venue expenses doubled between 2005 and 2007. The first rise appears to be related to the mass increase in shows presented, 31 more from 2005 to 2006, however venue expenses didn’t lower again when presented shows dropped back to 186 from 211 in 2007, in fact venue expenses continued to rise.
In 2012 along with the drop in overall expenses, average venue costs also dropped by 20% and essentially stayed in this lower portion over the next 5 years.

Conclusion:
It is clear that what while we do spend more on shows now than we did in the last decade we are currently not spending the most in our history. The overall rise is about $1800 from 2004 to 2016 per show. The data illustrates that our peak spending on shows, and understandably also on venues and tech expenses, is the period of 2009-2011. It is evident that a clear effort was made administratively to lower expenses from 2012 on, where expenses dropped by over 200k while trying to present the same number of productions. There is particularly a noticeable decrease in tech expenses year by year since 2011 with the last four being the lowest on record. Average venue costs as well have dropped to their lowest numbers since prior to 2007. This shows a deliberate effort to return the cost per show to those of earlier years, before the spike of 2009-2011. For further analysis an assessment of why expenses nearly doubled in the 5 year span of 2004 to 2009 should help clarify these results. But in conclusion we can assert that what we spend on each show has risen over the years but after administrative influence and costs cutting in 2012 onward, as illustrated by reductions in venue expenses and tech expenses among others, what we spend on each show is now lower than it was 6 years ago. . .  but at what cost? Next we need to look into staff size / expenses, etc. in these same years and consider the expenses associated with applying for government grants vs. the best possible outcome (funding which covers our presenting three or four shows at FringeNYC).

 

 

 

CONVENING – June 28th

Topic: The Open Access / Edinburgh / BYOV Model. Would it work in NYC? If so, how? How does participating in an open access festival differ from an adjudicated festival where the venue / staff are provided? Have you participated in an Open Access festival? Please join us, we need to hear from you! CLICK HERE FOR CONVENING INFO

 

 

 

 

 

CONVENING – Wednesday June 21st at 6:30pm

Topic: How can work that is devised over a longer period of time, or site-specific work (creatd for a particular location) work in a festival? In NYC? Do you make devised work? Or create site-specific performances? Please join us, we need to hear from you! CLICK HERE FOR CONVENING INFO

 

 

 

 

 

CONVENING – Wednesday June 14th at 6:30pm

Topic: What do dance / movement artists (and performance artists) need from a fringe festival in NYC? How does participating in a festival differ from performing elsewhere? What are dance artists’ particular needs? Please join us, we need to hear from you! Please note, this convening is being hosted by Eva Dean Dance at Union Street Studio CLICK HERE FOR CONVENING INFO

 

 

 

 

 

NYC Festival Application Periods

One thing about being an adjudicated festival is that 90% of our applications arrive on the last day. Would this change if our application period was longer? What do other NYC festivals (for which you can apply) do? We’ll find out, and post the results on this chart.

Wages at Edinburgh Festival Fringe

As we look into various federal, state, and city employment regulations and how they might impact which model of fringe festival we all decide is best for FringeNYC’s future, it is worth noting that a BYOV / Open Access festival can’t possibly be held responsible for what a venue and/or independent producer pays their team members.

So this article is a bit misleading. . .

Edinburgh Fringe Society can only model best practices as an employer (and they do. . . and have done). The same is true for accessibility and safety issues (though the city and government are often involved in those issues). The producers of a BYOV/Open Access festival don’t rent (hire) the venues and therefore cannot be responsible for their condition. Again – they can only suggest best practices and lend assistance.

What are your thoughts about all of this? Please comment below! Or are you a FringeNYC alumnus who has also participated in the Edinburgh Festival Fringe? If so, we’d love to see you at the June 28th Convening!

FringeNYC Venues – 1997 through 2006

Let’s talk about WHERE FringeNYC should be! Here is a map of the venues used in the first decade of the festival – 1997 through 2006. Which of these venues did you visit for the first time as a part of the festival? Note those that are no longer around. . . NOTE: BE SURE TO CLICK ON THE ACTUAL MAP TO VIEW IT IN THE INTERACTIVE / FULL SCREEN VERSION.

 

FringeNYC Venues – 2007 through 2016

Let’s talk about WHERE FringeNYC should be! Here is a map of the venues used in the second decade of the festival – 2007 through 2016. Which of these venues did you visit for the first time as a part of the festival? Note those that are no longer around. . . NOTE: BE SURE TO CLICK ON THE ACTUAL MAP TO VIEW IT IN THE INTERACTIVE / FULL SCREEN VERSION.

 

 

Adjudication in the P.U. Era

There are several ways that festivals (both fringe festivals and other NYC festivals) determine the line-up of artists / shows for their festival. Over the next weeks we’ll be exploring some of these methods as a part of the blank canvas project.

 

In 2013, Laura Collins-Hughes wrote a piece for the New York Times about why we were an adjudicated festival (and a bit about our adjudication process). The story also gets into how controversial this decision was at the time.

You can read the story here. 

More about the process we’ve used to determine our participants in an upcoming post!

 

Festival Models – Adjudicated

There are several ways that festivals (both fringe festivals and other NYC festivals) determine the line-up of artists / shows for their festival. Over the next weeks we’ll be exploring some of these methods as a part of the blank canvas project.

The model that FringeNYC has used over our first twenty years is what is called “adjudicated” – where applications are accepted, and then over a period of time, through a process involving many layers and adjudicators, a group of shows is selected to participate.

Over the next weeks we’ll explore the process we’ve used and how it has changed, what it is we have been looking for (and why) and what could change about that process. Keep reading – and join us at a convening to discuss this topic – or CLICK HERE for all posts tagged Adjudicated.

 

 

Festival Models – Curated

There are several ways that festivals (both fringe festivals and other NYC festivals) determine the line-up of artists / shows for their festival. Over the next weeks we’ll be exploring some of these methods as a part of the blank canvas project.

Although not employed by any fringe festivals that we know of, here in NYC it’s important that we at least mention the Curated model, so that we can compare and contract our NYC festival with other NYC festivals. To us, for purposes of this blank canvas project, “curated” festivals are those that do not accept unsolicited applications at all. In other words, these are festivals that are curated in much the same way as an Artistic Director curates a regular season of shows at a subscription theatre.

This is how the majority of the larger more prestigious non-fringe festivals across the city are programmed> In New York, though, this doesn’t mean that they aren’t programming innovative work and emerging artists. Quite the opposite, they sometimes have the resources to bring some of the most experimental and large-scale work to the U.S. for all of us to enjoy. How do these curated festivals affect what NYC needs from a fringe festival in 2018 and beyond? Should FringeNYC be the “fringe” / alternative option to these festivals? Keep reading – and join us at a convening to discuss this topic!

 

 

NYC Festivals Models & Size Comparison Chart

We’ll track some of the festivals that take place in NYC on the below chart – noting when they take place, how old they are, and what model is used for programming the artists / shows. If the festival is adjudicated or First Come First Serve / Lottery (i.e. anyone can apply to participate), we’ll be comparing the application & participation fees on a separate post. Stay tuned, we’ll update this post as we learn more. Got a comment or correction? Please comment below!

 

Festival Models – First Come First Serve / Lottery!

There are several ways that festivals (both fringe festivals and other NYC festivals) determine the line-up of artists / shows for their festival. Over the next weeks we’ll be exploring some of these methods as a part of the blank canvas project.

 

 

Today we’ll talk about the most popular method for our neighbors to the North (Canada), which is also shared by several of the oldest fringe festivals in this country, too! It’s the First Come, First Served method – where artists apply and the first applications received (be they hand delivered or arriving via mail or digitally) are the shows that will be a part of the festival.

Often, though, after several years of this method – it becomes too chaotic to manage. So then many festivals turn to the Lottery model – where applications are accepted for a certain period of time, and then participants are chosen from that applicant pool via a drawing. Some festivals make an evening of the drawing – with artists and audience member able to observe and get excited about the line up.

This method obviously has many advantages and disadvantages. It allows the festival producers to control the SIZE of the festival (as opposed to the Open Access / BYOV method). But does it limit the marketing assistance that can be provided, when the festival team knows nothing about the show? What effect does the randomness have on diversity? We’ll ask some fellow fringe festivals to learn more – and discuss at our Convening on April 12th. Join us there – and let us know your thoughts below!

 

 

Hypothesis – When it’s hotter we sell fewer tickets. . .

Hypothesis – When it’s hotter we sell fewer tickets. . .

So when it IS hotter, do we sell fewer tickets? Here’s what Christian found:

 

Observations:

  • Our 5 hottest years on record : 2016, 2015, 2005, 2002 & 2001
  • Our 5 smallest festival audiences : 2016, 2015, 2003, 2002 & 2001
  • The data illustrates that of the 5 extremes, 4 of them directly correlate (2001,2002, 2015 & 2016)
  • 2003 does show a relationship between temperature and ticket sales while 2005 seems to be an anomaly:
    • We can identify that 2003’s sales are generally following an upward trend (that stems from 2001 to 2006)
    • Additionally as we see the effects of El Niño decrease from 2002 to 2003, ticket sales did rise by around 6,000, this could be attributed to other factors (like overall sales rising over a 5 year period) but a relationship could also be observed
    • 2005 seems to be the key anomaly, it does not appear as an El Niño year by the National Weather Center but it’s our hottest year on record at 90 degrees. However while ticket sales remained healthy, it should be noted that there was a dip from the year prior and the one after, while the temperature also shifted, therefore a relationship can be observed as illustrated in the graph above
  • No high selling year (2004, 2006, 2009, 2010 & 2011) has an average temperature above 85 degrees

Conclusion:
While year to year relatively small rises and falls in temperature do not appear to actively affect our ticket sales, as illustrated from 2009 to 2011, there is an observable relationship between ticket sales and temperatures in the high extremes. One can conclude that while lower temperatures do not positively affect our ticket sales, that higher temperatures do negatively affect our overall sales. It appears that once we hit a festival average of above 85 degrees we not only face a decrease in ticket sales but also have issues with venues being able to keep air conditioning units functioning. With the exception of 2005, we can also assert that forecasts of El Niño Peak years will have a negative impact on our sales. While it is impossible to predict the weather with enough advance to properly alter our festival dates year by year an argument can be made, as illustrated in the graph from 2004 to 2006 and moreso from 2014 to 2016, that our audience is on average much more hesitant to purchase tickets when the average festival temperature rises over 85 degrees.

 

Hypothesis – It’s getting hotter. . .

Hypothesis – It’s getting hotter. . .

Or so I thought. Even when I made Christian remove the peak El Nino and La Nina years – it’s really just not the case. Hrmph. But the last two years HAVE been pretty hot. . .

 

 

Observations:
Our 5 hottest years on record (above 85 degrees): 2016, 2015, 2005, 2002 & 2001
Our 5 lowest temperature years (below 78 degrees): 2011, 2000, 1999, 1998 & 1997 (to be clear – it’s a darned good thing it was cooler outside in the first three years of the festival, since we didn’t have a lot of air conditioned spaces)
The data illustrates that of these extremes the earliest four years of the festival were in fact the coolest, while the last two years have been among the warmest
The hottest year on record was 2005
The warmest 5 year period was from 2001 to 2005
El Niño peak, with the exception of 2005, correlates with our hottest years on record (2002, 2015 & 2016) while La Niña peak correlates with the coolest years (2000 & 2011.)

Conclusion:
While it is generally scientifically accepted that the Earth’s temperatures are rising, and while the last two years on record have been among the hottest in our festival history, this data does not generally support the idea that our festival itself is experiencing a consistent rise in temperature. While the earliest years were our coolest years and our last two years were among the warmest, the graph illustrates a shift in temperatures over the years in cycles generally tied to weather changes like El Niño. It can be argued that the peaks and rises in temperature are getting slightly higher overall but it should be noted that both the record high (2005) and the record low (2000) were in the earlier part of our history. So we are led to conclude that while scientifically the earth is getting warmer and that while our first four years are cooler and our last two years are hotter, the major peaks in temperature in our eleven to sixteen festival days over a twenty year period appear to be cyclical, for example hotter years like 2015-2016 were preceded by moderate years 2011-2014; hotter years like 2009-2010 were preceded by moderate years 2006-2008, and hotter years like 2001-2002 were preceded by cooler years 1997-2000.

Here’s the graph with the El Niño and La Niña peak years removed.

 

 

US & World Fringe Festivals – Open Access / BYOV Fees

Most Open Access / BYOV festivals charge participation fees – like any other programming model festival. Some also participate in box office income. On this post we’ll list some Open Access festivals in the U.S. and their participation fees, as well as what the NYC Equivalent fee would be, per cost of living. We’ll also track some international festivals in the same way – first converting the fee to US Dollars, and then using the same cost of living adjustment (based on www.numbeo.com). We’ll update this post as we learn more!

*The only BYOV option offered at Minnesota Fringe is Site Specific.

Festival Models – Open Access / Edinburgh / BYOV!

There are several ways that festivals (both fringe festivals and other NYC festivals) determine the line-up of artists / shows for their festival. Over the next weeks we’ll be exploring some of these methods as a part of the blank canvas project.

First up is what we’ll call the Open Access method, which is what the original fringe festival – Edinburgh Festival Fringe, in Scotland – uses. In fact, it is for this reason that the Open Access method is sometimes called the Edinburgh model. Here in the United States we sometimes refer to this model as BYOV (Bring Your Own Venue).

But whatever you call it, the Open Access model means that any artist can be a part of the festival – they merely need to register (and generally pay a registration fee) and then find and hire / rent a venue in which to do their show. This method obviously has many advantages and disadvantages – and can lead to enormous and wonderful festivals. How would this work in NYC? Keep reading – and join us at a convening to discuss this topic – or CLICK HERE for all posts tagged Open Access